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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Late May

A photo tour as June approaches

Transition zones, such as the mudroom, become crowded in late May

Table, put together from scraps, is ready for another summer of outdoor meals

Covering paths with grass clippings.

View south past the compost bins and grape arbor toward the barn

Overview of main garden. In view: peas, chives, spinach, garlic, lettuce, tomatoes, poppies, sweet Williams, cosmos, zinnias, green beans, winter squash, summer squash, leeks, cukes, blueberries,quinces, apples, sunchokes, cherries, pears, raspberries, grapes, compost bin.

Cherries, pears, quinces and apples in the chicken moat/run/pasture. Stone mulched.





4 comments:

  1. I like to think about this time of year as the "Promise of Spring". The garden is all laid out in tidy rows with nary a weed. There is a lot of brown earth present with little seedlings coming up, and all of the messy left-over plants from last year have finally gone to the compost pile. I my garden the bamboo trellises for the tomatoes and beans appear neat and bare.
    Already the spare green of April has succumbed to the too green of the filled in May canopy. Once the weather warms, no single person will be able to keep up with the rampant growth that summer brings. The tidy garden rows will fill with produce and weeds. And the summer bugs will come - already cabbage worms and leaf miners are about in my garden. That control we seem to have in May will be overwhelmed by nature's lust for life come summer.

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  2. I love photo tours. Your garden looks great. Do you have any problem from seeds in the grass clippings?

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  3. Not much. We see more sprouting of wheat in the straw than grass in the clippings. We just flip the sheaves of straw over. But we try to get to the grass before there are seed heads, and then lay off the stuff entirely come fall, when there are all kinds of seeds in it.

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